Posts made in July, 2010


Send a S.A.S.E. [self-addressed stamped envelope] to The L’il Happy Invisible Creature S.A.S.E. Club and they will send you stuff back! BUT, there’s a creative catch! “Regardless of your artistic ability”, they want your envelope to be designed or illustrated by you! They will post the coolest ones on their Lil’ Happy Twitter page. Thanks Andy for...

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What drives creativity?By Harvey Mackay Imagine if you could turn on creativity like starting a car, rev the engine to get up to speed, cruise along in the fast lane, and then park it in the garage until you needed it again. Is there anything you couldn’t accomplish? We’ve all had days when the engine stalls, the tire is flat or road construction brings traffic to a screeching halt. Nothing seems to get us going. You can’t always sit around and wait for inspiration to strike. Amateurs wait for inspiration. The real pros get up and go to work. They understand that you are not born with creativity … and you have to cultivate creativity on an ongoing basis. Here are some ideas: * Keep a journal. Record ideas as soon as they come to you by keeping a notebook close at hand all the time. A real notebook, not a digital one, is best, allowing you to make sketches and drawings, but anything that lets you capture your thoughts will work. When you need to charge up your creativity, search your notebook for ideas and examples. * Search your environment for inspiration. Artists find inspiration in many unlikely places. If looking at the same four walls every day limits your perspective, add some elements that help you see things in a new way — pictures, plants, books, even toys. * Question everything. Ask “why” and “how” to determine if there’s a better way to solve a problem. Another favorite question of mine: “What’s missing?” * Turn problems around. Switch gears by looking for the opposite of what you want. Exploring how you could make a bad situation worse can sometimes tell you what not to do. Looking for a bad idea may lead you to a good one. * Combine random elements. Try this exercise: Look at two items on your desk right now and figure out a way to put them together. A clock radio and a coffee mug, for instance, could be turned into a coffee mug with a clock on it, maybe at the bottom. This won’t necessarily generate a useful idea, but it will train your mind to see different possibilities. * Recruit a partner. Bounce ideas off another person–someone you’re comfortable with, but someone who will challenge you when necessary. With another person involved, you’re not limited to your own experience and perspective. * Read something totally different than usual. Too often, we find ourselves looking at the same newspapers, trade publications, blogs and the like. Pick up a murder mystery, a gardening book, a Shakespeare volume or anything that will teach you...

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